Friday, October 27, 2006

I could do this

I learned a lot at my conference, most interesting was what I wrote about in my last post. At one of the breakfast roundtable on press release writing, I realized, "I could teach this." I knew more than the presenter, although she's been doing it longer. People started addressing their questions to me instead of the leader, which I tried to deflect back to her out of politeness.

I just finished teaching an adult ed class on freelance writing, so the idea of other courses to teach was in my head. I'm not sure if adult ed centers would want a class on press release writing, but I'll look into it. I also would love to teach a class on creating a writing community--about the importance of writer's groups, writing friends, and blogging. My dream would be to teach writing at the college level in the near future. I think I could teach medical writing, journalistic writing, and probably creative writing, though I haven't published in that genre (yet!). So, readers, any advice? I know quite a few of you are teachers at the college level... Best Blogger Tips

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi Bug. You could do it. You're very impressive! I want to talk to you about what you teach in your freelance course (from a student's perspective!). In philosophy or women's studies, we don't look at anyone without a phd. But the credentials for teaching writing might be different. If the Lesley faculty is any indication, at least one acclaimed book seems to be a prereq. The degree is less important than the track record of successful publishing. There might also the route of freelancing on the workshop/seminar circuit, as the instructors at your conference might be doing. It also pays better than parttime academic work. Fulltime, of course, is a different thing altogether, but then there is less time for creative projects.

bostonerin said...

Hey Bug

I'd be happy to give you a brain dump about the teaching-writing-with-an-MFA gig. Basically, you need both good publishing credits and teaching experience. Starting off at the community college level worked for me. Like Ti said, an acclaimed book is the best thing you can have, if you want to teach at a private liberal arts college. That's why I'm in my holding pattern....

GoGo said...

not there myself, but am cheering you on! Daringtowrite.blogspot.com, runs her own writing groups. She may be of help and she is a good read.

Good luck with it all, I look forward to reading your stuff in print.

Bug said...

Thanks everyone! TI, let's def talk freelancing--online or offline while knitting in Jan. :)
And thanks for the idea of teaching at conferences/seminars. Even though you'd think I would've thought of that from my post, I hadn't!

Erin, I would love to pick your brain about teaching. January mentioned getting together again soon--want to combine missions and get some food/drinks and talk shop for a little while?

Anonymous said...

Yes, we definitely have to do a lunch, and then we should plan a Boston bloggers event.

I agree with all that's been said. Having a successful publishing track record helps. If teaching is something you're looking into for the future, then I would consider sending out some short stories and articles for publication now since the response time takes so long.

Having published works under your belt gives you more options.

Kim G. said...

Well, I can't speak as one currently in academia, but when I was in school (about 5 years ago) there seemed to be a shortage of writing courses that address the real world marriage of creative/technical. They didn't seem to want to break out of their boxes and realize there is a need to integrate the skills from both disciplines as well as the PR element in many of the real world writing people do in their jobs. As someone with a technical writing minor, I know I learned to write a press release in one of my classes, but it was a breif exercise - I think I wrote one. If asked to to it in my current job, I could probably stumble through, but it's something I'm not really confident I could do well. I think the idea of teaching professionals some of these skills would be an excellent opportunity if teaching in a college environment doesn't work out for you. Keep us update on this! It sounds fascinating!

Bug said...

Good ideas, Kim G. Thanks!

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